Place names are important to our cultural heritage as they tell the story of the Carneddau and provide an insight into the unrecorded history of the people living and working on this land over past centuries. We are working to ensure that this rich heritage is recorded and celebrated.

Changes in the landscape can be captured in place names; the name of a patch of land might refer to some ancient use or to the colour of the vegetation. We are collecting names that may not have been recorded on documents but remain in the memories of families; names of buildings, paths, streams or even stones. Some features may have been lost and the only reminder is the name. This can be just as important to understanding the landscape as visible history.

Below are some examples of this history captured in place names in the Carneddau.

  • Waun Fflogyn
    Wildlife can be hidden away in place names. This is visible in the name Waun Fflogyn, a field in Cwm Nant y Benglog on the base of Tryfan. The name is thought to refer to an historic association with woodcock, a bird which was hunted for its meat and its feathers and were used by local fishermen.

 

  • Bryn-y-gwenith
    The place name Bryn-y-gwenith to the north of Afon Porth Llwyd indicates that wheat (‘gwenith’) was cultivated in the uplands.

 

  • Hafod
    There are numerous ‘hafod’ names in the area, which relate to the former upland summer dwellings and pastures.
Map image of the Carneddau area supported by the Carneddau Landscape Partnership
Beer barrels
Reflecting historic events and activities

The field names of a farm near Llanllechid include a small field known as ‘Cae Ffeltiwr’, where a felt-hat maker once lived. Place names given to locations in the landscape over generations often reflect events, activities and associations. ‘Maen Cwrw’ (beer stone) on Llanllechid Common is one example. Named as such because staff from Penrhyn Castle would come up on mules and leave beer barrels and food for the estate here.

Some common Welsh names used in Carneddau and the wider landscape: